Lu-Hai Liang

thoughts from a freelance foreign correspondent

All the Technology I Use to Do Journalism

with 2 comments

IMG_0635 (2)

The above photo collects all the gadgetry that I use for my journalism work:

  • Olympus digital voice recorder
  • LG G2 smartphone
  • Lenovo Ideapad S210 touchscreen laptop
  • Canon S120 digital camera

The Olympus dictaphone was bought in England after I lost my previous Olympus. It cost £65. It picks up voices very well – defined from background noise. It has a little built-in stand that raises it from a surface, and the ability to slow down audio which comes in handy when transcribing interviews. There are fancier voice recorders out there (Sony do nice expensive ones) but unless you’re looking to record broadcast quality interviews, the Olympus is a lovely piece of kit.

The LG G2 smartphone is a new addition. My previous mobile phone (pictured in the top left of the photo) was a £60 “Softbank” smartphone bought in Hong Kong two years ago. A budget smartphone from 2012 is pretty ancient technology now and was starting to seriously slow, so I bought the LG secondhand in Bangkok for the equivalent of £165. The processor inside it is the generation ahead of the Samsung Galaxy S4 but a step behind the latest S5. So it’s still blazingly quick, and the G2’s camera is a massive upgrade from the Softbank’s and the screen is also about 1,600 times better. I use smartphones to jot down memos and article ideas while on the move; as a kind of scanner (with the camera) and as a phone obvs.

The laptop I picked up in Hong Kong & I wrote about it previously.

The Canon S120 camera was bought in Beijing earlier this year for the equivalent of £256. It works very well. It powers on quickly, focuses quickly and the best thing about it is that it’s incredibly small and unobtrusive. It also takes exceedingly good video. Photos I’ve taken using it have been published by The Telegraph and Aljazeera who paid me $450 for a photo gallery of shots I took in North Korea. I do also own a Canon 450D DSLR (which I used to take the above image) but I hardly use it these days. I didn’t take it to North Korea for instance because I knew it would be more conspicuous than a small compact camera and this would have a greater effect on the behavior of North Korean civilians, and because I knew that fiddling around with the DSLR would cause me to miss shots when the Canon S120 would make me a much more agile photographer.

**

I’m pretty happy with the equipment I have. The total cost is much less than a grand. Sure it’d be nice to have a Surface Pro 3 which has much better battery life than my current laptop (I like to work in cafes). And perhaps an iPad – for magazine subscriptions – and as a backup browser screen for reference purposes. But they are not essential. Upgrades would be a Samsung Galaxy Note 3: I love the stylus that comes with it; its features are very useful for a freelance journalist. And a Canon EOS M which is a camera slightly larger than the Canon S120 but with picture quality equal to DSLRs.

But I do not like to upgrade quickly. It’s a waste of money that could be spent on travel or experiences or stories. And in the next couple years everything will be that much better again. So don’t obsess about your kit, think instead about how to make the most of it.

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2 Responses

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  1. Another good read, just looking to pick up voice recorder and camera now, was first hoping to use the iPhone as my swiss army knife 😀

    shan5742

    September 7, 2014 at 11:45 pm

    • Yes the iPhone is a media production machine! I’ve written about it previously and yes it can do pretty much all you need. A voice recorder is good to have though and a good investment as it should last a long time (unless you misplace it like I did!). Can always use an iPhone as a backup recorder as well then.

      A decent camera is nice to have although not as essential as many people think, especially if just writing articles is your thing.

      Lu-Hai Liang

      September 12, 2014 at 1:22 pm


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